Converting a Recipe to Make it HEALTHIER!

 

Bacon Wrapped, Cream Cheese Stuffed Chicken Breasts

Bacon Wrapped, Cream Cheese Stuffed Chicken Breasts CONVERTED TO: “Turkey Bacon Wrapped, Yogurt Cheese Stuffed Chicken Breasts”

People associate healthy foods with tasting disgusting, being hard to prepare and/or cook, out-of-the-way (the standard grocery store is typically easier to find than the health food store) and downright hard to do! It doesn’t have to be that way. There are considerably simple ways to make things healthy and delicious without a (major) fuss.
Here is how I would convert this recipe for “Bacon Wrapped, Cream Cheese Stuffed Chicken Breasts” over to being “healthier” in a way that at least cuts calories and fat…

ORIGINAL RECIPE:
Ingredients:
1 boneless skinless chicken breast
2 tablespoons cream cheese
1 tablespoon green onion, Chopped
2 pieces bacon, Partially Cooked
Directions:
Pound out Chicken breast so it is about 1/4″ thick.
Mix together cream cheese and green onions and spread cheese mixture over 1 side of chicken breast.
Roll Chicken breast up to conceal cream cheese.
Wrap partially cooked bacon around chicken breast and secure with toothpick
Place on baking sheet and back for about 30 minutes at 375.
Broil for about 5 minute to crisp bacon.

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MODIFIED LOW FAT LOW CALORIE RECIPE:
Ingredients:
1 boneless skinless chicken breast
2 TABLESPOONS YOGURT CHEESE (SEE INSTRUCTIONS BELOW)
1 tablespoon green onion, Chopped
2 pieces TURKEY bacon, Partially Cooked
Directions:
Pound out Chicken breast so it is about 1/4″ thick.
Mix together cream cheese and green onions and spread cheese mixture over 1 side of chicken breast.
Roll Chicken breast up to conceal cream cheese.
Wrap partially cooked bacon around chicken breast and secure with toothpick.
Place on baking sheet and back for about 30 minutes at 375.
Broil for about 5 minute to crisp bacon.

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HOW TO MAKE YOGURT CHEESE:
*This should be prepared the night before your intend to cook your meal!

  • 1 Deep bowl with a lipped edge (i.e. a plastic gladware container)
  • 1 Piece of Cheesecloth which is larger than the circumference of the top of the bowl
  • A rubberband

Instructions:

  • Place cheese cloth over top of bowl with a little slack inside of the bowl. Place rubberband around the bowl to secure it.
  • Place 1 Cup of Lowfat Greek Yogurt (Wegmans Brand makes a good one that’s cheaper than Chobani) on top the cheesecloth. You should have left enough slack for the cheesebloth to “sink” in a little bit but not touch the bottom.
  • Let sit overnight.
  • The next morning, you can place the now yogurt “cheese” into a bowl and use for cooking when you are ready to start your recipe. *You can also Let it sit longer if desired thickness is not reached.
  • You may want to add a pinch of sea salt (or Himalayan pink salt to it) and mix it in for additional cream-cheese-like flavor.

The remaining liquid in the bowl is Acidophilus.

You can drink this liquid straight up or you can save it and add it to juice, smoothies, or any fermented foods you might be creating (i.e. pickles or sauerkraut.)

Lactobacillus acidophilus belongs to a group of bacteria that normally live in the human small intestine and vagina. L. acidophilus is one of the most commonly used probiotics, or ‘good germs.’ These are microorganisms that help to maintain a healthy intestinal tract and aid digestion. (mayoclinic.com)”

Acidophilus is good for the body’s flora and immune system, since 70% of the bodies immune system exists within the gut.

Yogurt cheese is absolutely delicious and is great on bagels, or any recipe calling for cream cheese or sour cream.

Enjoy! 🙂

Penelope Cruz Wears Acupuncture “Seeds” to Movie Premier – from E! News

Penelope Cruz Wears Acupuncture “Seeds” to Movie Premier – from E! News. Cruz was spotted using auricular (ear) acupuncture at her recent red carpet for Venuto Al Mondo.
http://pinterest.com/pin/255016397622475332/
“Auriculotherapy can be used for fertility, but those are not fertility points on her ear,” said Jill Blakeway, director of the Manhattan-based YinOva Center for complementary medicine. “Hers is a very standard protocol for people with stressful, busy lives.”
Read more from abc news!

Acupressure bands for Nausea, Headache, PMS, and Insomnia

As acupuncture continues to trickle down from “taboo” to mainstream – acupressure follows with several bands which apply pressure to convenient points located along the hands, wrists and lower leg for common ailments including Nausea (PC6), Insomnia (HT7), PMS (SP6) , and Headaches (LI4).

Acupuncture/acupressure bands!

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Acupuncture makes its way into the mainstream with products similar to the popular “sea band” used for motion sickness and nausea. New bands include pressure applied at convenient points frequently used for headache, menstrual pain, and insomnia. The points utilized appear to be: Anti nausea/motion sickness: PC6 (pericardium 6) Anti menstrual pain: SP6 (spleen 6) Sleep aid: HT7 (heart 7) anti headache: LI4 (large intestine 4)

TCM – “Dampness” Imbalance

Chinese Medicine “dampness” pathogen and Food Therapy!
Acupuncture Today
April, 2008, Vol. 09, Issue 04  

TCM Dampness and Food Therapy
By Edward F. Block IV, PhD

In medicine, the study of etiology refers to the study of the origins of disease. The study of pathogenesis is the study of the actual processes within the body whereby disease occurs, develops and changes.

One of the most central concepts of TCM is that of the intimate connection between the body and the environment. The physiology of the cells, tissues, zang-fu organs and meridian system of the body is in dynamic internal equilibrium and constantly adjusts to the vagaries of the external environment. If the body is not able to cope with changes in the environment, internal equilibrium will be lost and disease will result. Thus, according to the constitution of any particular individual, the presence of disease is due to a lack of adaptability by the physiology of that individual to the conditions of the environment.1
There is a saying in TCM: “The earth element creates damp and the metal element stores it.” The organs associated with the earth element are the stomach and spleen. The organs associated with the metal element are the lungs and large intestine. When dampness is created by impaired digestion, it likes to end up in the lungs and large intestine. When dampness moves into the lungs, the usual symptom is phlegm coming up while coughing (especially after eating something that is inherently difficult to digest such as cold dairy products or greasy foods). When the dampness is stored in the large intestine, we find mucus-lined stools, loose stools, sticky stools that are difficult to clean up after or diarrhea with undigested bits of food. Even intestinal rumblings are due to dampness. Internal dampness is directly due to the impaired transfomative and transportive function of the spleen system that then results in some form of pathogenesis within the body, zang-fu and meridians.

In Chinese medicine, dampness is considered to be the cause of many illnesses such as high cholesterol, cancer, metabolic disorders, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, allergies and environmental illness. For the sake of this discussion, only the symptoms of the aberrations of water metabolism will be considered. There are two general categories of dampness: external and internal. Internal dampness is the most common and easily will combine with heat or cold to cause damp-heat or damp-cold. Dampness can be thought of as the condition of “high humidity” inside the body. Symptoms can include a feeling of heaviness, swelling or water retention, distended abdomen, phlegm discharge, nodular masses, loose bowels and turbidity of fluids. Individuals with a dampness condition often have sluggish energy and easily gain weight. The pulse commonly is slippery; the tongue often is puffy with teeth marks and a greasy coat.

External dampness is a condition of prolonged high humidity that usually occurs in late summer. When exterior dampness invades the body, it tends to do so from the lower extremities first. Dampness then works its way up the legs and settles into the lower jiao and spreads throughout the body. Patients often complain of dizziness, a heavy sensation in the head and body, and joint soreness and pain. In both external and internal dampness, there may be turbid discharges that form on the body (such as suppurating sores, weeping eczema, profuse purulent leukorrhea with a foul odor, turbid urine and stools containing mucus and even blood).2 Summer heat with dampness causes dizziness, heaviness in the head, a stifling sensation in the chest, nausea, poor appetite, loose stools, general lassitude, fever, restlessness and thirst.

A collection of dampness and heat may lead to such problems as inflammation, allergies (especially food allergies), high blood sugar, weight gain and urinary tract infections. Symptoms can include a smelly and sluggish bowel, abdominal pain, leukorrhea, eczema, and deep-yellow colored urine. The pulse often is slippery and fast; the tongue commonly is red with a yellow, greasy coating; the nails are often red; and the hands often are puffy and red, with a mottled appearance and swollen red cuticles.